Offices in Fort Worth, Irving & Flower Mound (DFW)

844-ULT-LOSE or local (817)-850-1100

Offices in Fort Worth, Irving & Flower Mound (DFW)

844-ULT-LOSE or local (817)-850-1100

The relation between obesity and other health concerns

The relation between obesity and other health concerns

Health concerns and disease are often linked. An increased risk in one category often leads to an increased risk in another category. And those co-morbid conditions can sometimes have serious detrimental health effects in a person. That’s why when we look at qualifications for weight loss procedures, we look at more than simply weight. We often look at co-morbid conditions to assess the health risks of obesity and the potential benefits from weight loss.

Researchers are always looking at the links between diseases and how improvements in one condition may lead to improvements in another condition. And a recent study did just that for patients experiencing chronic kidney disease (CKD) as an effect of type 2 diabetes. Diabetics with CKD face a much higher mortality rate than the average population or diabetics who do not have CKD. In this trial study, doctors looked at whether weight loss surgery would affect the remission rates of albuminuria (found in the urine and is a marker for CKD). The control group received “best medical treatment” because researchers wanted to see the difference between current medical treatments and weight loss surgery. In this particular study, remission rates for early stages of CKD were found in nearly half of the patients in that cohort and over 81% in the patients in the surgery cohort. “In conclusion, the researchers said, “After 24 months, RYGB was more effective than best medical treatment for achieving remission of albuminuria and CKD stage G1 to G-3 and A2 to A-3 in patients with type 2 diabetes and obesity. Our findings highlight the potential of RYGB as a new treatment paradigm that should be considered to slow or arrest CKD progression in patients with type 2 diabetes and obesity.” (Socha, 2020).

While this is but one study, it is important to look at the broader picture. You are a whole person, all the systems and organs and everything else in your body are connected. When one part is injured or diseased, the whole body is affected. When one part is taken care of or healed, other parts sometimes are improved as well. The research is looking for the details--the specifics of how all those parts are connected and how they affect each other. But the bigger picture, even without the specifics, is that when you begin taking care of yourself, you may be surprised how other parts of your body--and your life--improve as well.

Read more about this study at https://www.docwirenews.com/nephtimes/gastric-bypass-surgery-lowers-rate-of-ckd-progression-versus-best-medical-treatment/?fbclid=IwAR3CzEQr1D6RDKFERdnomIoInT990ewFwQ-1n3snLY1s8iKiiWvIclph4v0

This information is intended for educational purposes only and is not meant to substitute for medical care or to prescribe treatment for any specific health condition. These posts are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Consult your doctor for information on making medical decisions.